Wanted PR consultant Ryan Chamberlain in FBI custody

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Ryan Chamberlain carried away by SFPD, as questions remain as to the nature of the FBI's investigation.
Photo courtesy of ABC 7

San Francisco Police Department Officers took San Francisco political insider and PR consultant Ryan Chamberlain into custody on June 2 in the area around Crissy Field, media outlets are reporting. Chamberlain was targeted by the FBI on June 1 for alleged possession of explosive materials, and became the subject of a nationwide manhunt after federal agents equipped with a Hazmat team raided his apartment in Russian Hill. 

Multiple accounts reported Chamberlain cried out "help me!" as San Francisco Police Department officers arrested him.

Before apprehending Chamberlain, SFPD officers were securing the area around San Francisco’s Crissy Field, according to the communications on live radio broadcasts.

“More units are coming down we're getting everyone out of here,” a voice said over the police scanner around 6:20pm. “I got the phone numbers of those FBI agents. We need assistance clearing the parking lot."

“On-duty EOD units, come up on the air for the Crissy Field situation,” another voice said over the police scanner around 6:30, referencing the department’s explosive ordinance disposal unit.

Phillip Hirsch, a bystander, took this footage of Chamberlain's arrest.

Despite releasing a note on iCloud that was widely interpreted as a suicide note, Chamberlain appeared to resurface on Twitter earlier this afternoon in a post rejecting the FBI’s allegations against him as untrue. 

His friends, many of whom are well-connected political insiders who work on election campaigns in San Francisco, were taking to social media to cast doubt on federal authorities’ case against him.

Political consultant Johnny K. Wang, who described himself as a friend of Chamberlain’s and said he’s known him for years, expressed doubt that he was capable of domestic terrorism.

“I truly believe that once the [FBI’s] cards are shown, they’ll have nothing,” Wang said. “I would like to see what they have. If there were actual bomb making materials, then yeah, that’s something. It better be a bags of fertilizer or something. He’s a well-connected, well-loved guy in the community. If [the FBI] just ruined his life … I’m pretty sure the FBI will be made to pay for this. They’re going to be made to pay for this. It’s unacceptable. I want to see some real bomb making materials. I want to see a car that’s rigged to explode. Because otherwise, it’s just accusations.”

Now that Chamberlain is in custody, maybe the FBI will offer some answers.

 

Comments

On May 4th, 2013, the SFPD, along with the San Francisco Bomb Squad and the FBI descended on my San Francisco apartment in Noe Valley suspecting me of domestic terrorism.

They ransacked my apartment and detained me for three hours as my entire block was evacuated and I was forced to watch.

The bomb squad, the FBI, and SFPD found nothing. I was released. There were no apologies given to me.

As someone who is an outspoken political activist with strong opinions about a great many political issues, I was targeted by the SFPD and the FBI in a very similar way as this alleged domestic terrorist is being targeted.

If it turns out that the FBI and the SFPD don't have sufficient evidence to even charge this man with any substantial crime, then I think a full investigation into the practices of the SFPD and the San Francisco office of the FBI should be launched because this kind of thing appears to be a common occurrence for the SFPD and the San Francisco branch of the FBI. If they are wrong about Ryan Chamberlin, and they were wrong about me, then how many more of these cases of grievous, egregious violations of our civil liberties by the SFPD and the San Francisco branch of the FBI are there?

If there are more victims of these practices by the trusted law enforcement of San Francisco, and Ryan Chamberlin is yet another victim, then I say bring back the Internal Affairs division of the SFPD, gather the victims up and bring a class action lawsuit against the SFPD, and suspend the officers who were responsible for ruining the lives of victims like me, and potentially Ryan Chamberlin.

Now, I will wait to find out what the facts in this case are.

Posted by Amrit Kohli on Jun. 02, 2014 @ 9:13 pm

On May 4th, 2013, the SFPD, along with the San Francisco Bomb Squad and the FBI descended on my San Francisco apartment in Noe Valley suspecting me of domestic terrorism.

They ransacked my apartment and detained me for three hours as my entire block was evacuated and I was forced to watch.

The bomb squad, the FBI, and SFPD found nothing. I was released. There were no apologies given to me.

As someone who is an outspoken political activist with strong opinions about a great many political issues, I was targeted by the SFPD and the FBI in a very similar way as this alleged domestic terrorist is being targeted.

If it turns out that the FBI and the SFPD don't have sufficient evidence to even charge this man with any substantial crime, then I think a full investigation into the practices of the SFPD and the San Francisco office of the FBI should be launched because this kind of thing appears to be a common occurrence for the SFPD and the San Francisco branch of the FBI. If they are wrong about Ryan Chamberlin, and they were wrong about me, then how many more of these cases of grievous, egregious violations of our civil liberties by the SFPD and the San Francisco branch of the FBI are there?

If there are more victims of these practices by the trusted law enforcement of San Francisco, and Ryan Chamberlin is yet another victim, then I say bring back the Internal Affairs division of the SFPD, gather the victims up and bring a class action lawsuit against the SFPD, and suspend the officers who were responsible for ruining the lives of victims like me, and potentially Ryan Chamberlin.

Now, I will wait to find out what the facts in this case are.

Posted by Amrit Kohli on Jun. 02, 2014 @ 9:16 pm

Until we start challenging law enforcement and the pansy judges who sign off on warrants under flimsy pretenses we'll never keep what little civil rights we have left in the country, including the right to talk frankly on the internet about the encroaching police state. It's funny how there's always plenty of money to pay law dozens of law enforcement to track down free speech advocates or political firebrands, but there's never enough money to house poor people or find work for the 20% of the population that's under-employed and unemployed. We should never forget that the government is very close allies to some of the most repressive political regimes in the Middle East and SE Asia, while it wages high and low intensity warfare against elected governments trying to work through decades and centuries of repressive military rule. Where are the US invasions of Thailand or Egypt after the military coups there? Yet we all know the CIA and its "contractors" are working 24/7 to topple the elected government in Venezuela and other democratically elected governments throughout the world.

Let's hope Russia and China successfully establish an alternative to the US dollar, which will force trillions of dollars back into the US and debase the currency, a plot straight out of the CIA operations handbook. When a quart of milk starts costing $20 and a gallon of gas goes for $50 maybe the US public will finally wake-up to the wholesale financial rape of the US economy over the past few decades by Wall Street and both political parties.

Posted by Guest on Jun. 02, 2014 @ 9:51 pm

Unfortunately, his lawsuit didn't have anything more than his posting (known as "facts") and was dismissed (after he was given a month to amend the suit).

The judge found that:

Although Kohli concludes that he was wrongfully detained and discriminated against
on the basis of race, nationality, and mental health disability, such conclusory allegations do not provide sufficient factual content to allow the Court to reasonably infer that a constitutional violation occurred. Facts specifying when Kohli was arrested and detained, where the incidents occurred, which officers were involved, how the events unfolded, and the basis for alleging discriminatory conduct are absent from Kohli‟s complaint.

and:

Kohli fails to plead a false imprisonment claim that is plausible on its face. Kohli
alleges the following: he was “wrongfully arrested and placed under 5150 detention
multiple times by the [SFPD] with no reasonable justification”; the SFPD took his liberty by wrongfully arresting and detaining him; he was evicted as a result of police conduct; and the SFPD misused their power. Dkt. No. 1 at 1-2, 6. These allegations are insufficient for several reasons. First, Kohli‟s allegations are not specific enough to allow the Court to reasonably infer that instances of arrest and detention occurred. Missing from the complaint are facts regarding the time and location of arrests, which individuals were involved, and the circumstances surrounding the events.

Posted by James on Jun. 02, 2014 @ 10:49 pm

So he claimed that the SFPD targeted him because he's nuts? In most places that's called pro-active police work. If the Isla Vista PD had been a little more thourogh in their investigation of Rodger and his "mental disability", they might have been able to prevent the tragedy down south.

Posted by Guest on Jun. 02, 2014 @ 11:32 pm

An apology is only right when you're wrong. Especially, publicly humiliating and destroying someone's life. It's two small words.....I'm sorry.

Posted by Guest Tina Williams on Jun. 03, 2014 @ 8:17 am

Thank you to those of you who came out in support of my situation.

Fact is, I let the case against the SFPD go. I had no legal representation, I was fighting an uphill battle having no legal expertise of my own, and I was exhausted. The damage to my mental state of mind was done, not by me, but by the eggregious violations to my rights that the FBI and the SFPD were party to causing me. I did my best to stand up to these hooligans. But I continue to recover from these events and have just gotten back on my feet more than one year after this out of control paranoia besiged my life last year.

Public safety is one thing. But civil liberties are not something you sacrifice because you're raising a culture of lunatics who think guns are a right they have indiscriminately and without limitation. You weaponize this culture and then you have no right to wonder why it's one of the most violent cultures in the world. You can't take away people's rights in an effort to protect them. You take away people's guns if you want to do something about public safety. Repeal the Second Amendment!

Guns are not a right.

No civilized society, as this claims to be, should have a right to weaponry.

Period.

I gave up on my case against the SFPD. I just don't have it in me to fight every law enforcement agency in the nation without an attorney. Not only were the SFPD and the FBI involved in the raid that took place at my Noe Valley apartment last year, the United States Secret Service was on point to protect me from the lunatics at the FBI and the SFPD, and the NSA and CIA absolutely were involved in investigating me because I am such an outspoken political activist. You try being subjected to that level of scrutiny and surveillance and then tell me you can handle it and that it wouldn't cause a decompensation in your mental stability.

Check out http://immigrantscanbepresidents.com

And read my manifesto authored by me in 1996 and then call me a terrorist because that's what makes Americans feel better about themselves...to suspect and condemn anyone who actually proposes solutions to our violent past and the promise of a violent future. We learn to hate what we don't understand, and the fact that my skin is brown gave the SFPD and the FBI all the authority they needed to label me a terrorist.

My manifesto is reproduced here:

http://amritkohli.net

Thanks for your support.

Amrit Kohli

Posted by Amrit Kohli on Jun. 03, 2014 @ 12:42 pm

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